Tag Archive | theme-family life

Perfect Picture Book Friday – Saturday is Dadurday

Perfect Picture Book Fridays are the creation of the lovely children’s book author Susanna Leonard Hill. Check in each week on Fridays for new book reviews. Susanna also has a complete list (alphabetically and by theme) of all the book reviews. It’s a wonderful resource if you’re looking for activities for a book, or books focused on a particular theme.

booklovebadgeCALLING ALL CUPIDS!

I’m challenging my fellow book-lovers this month to show the books and authors they love a little extra affection by posting reviews on Amazon, Goodreads, and other social media. Read more about the Book Love blog hop, and if you review books for PPBF, consider yourself tagged!

 

Title: Saturday Is Dadurdaysaturday_is_dadurday

Author: Robin Pulver

Illustrator: R. W. Alley

Publisher: Bloomsbury

Year: 2013

Genre: Fiction picture book

Ages: 4-8

Themes: Family life; fathers; dealing with disappointment

Opening:

After the twins were born, Mimi and Dad had an idea for their same favorite day. It came after Friday, and Mimi and Dad called it Dadurday.

Synopsis: (from publisher’s website) For Mimi, the best day of the week is always Saturday, because she gets to spend it with just her Dad. Every “Dadurday” begins the same way–Mimi and Dad make silly-shaped pancakes, read the comics section of the newspaper and make lists of fun things to do together. But when Dad gets a new work schedule, “Dadurday” is ruined. Can Mimi find a way to still make it a special day for her and dad?

What makes it great: Mothers loom large in the picture book landscape so it’s refreshing to read a book where the dad/daughter relationship is the focus.

What readers notice: My daughter liked the plays on words in the book, from “Dadurday” in the title, to “Badurday,” “Madurday,” and “Sadurday,” reflecting Mimi’s disappointment when she learns that Dad will have to work on Saturdays.

What a writer notices: I liked that Dad and Mom played essential roles in this story, while still letting Mimi come to a very realistic, child-centered solution on her own.

Activities/Resources:

Some resources for teaching days of the week:

http://www.schoolsparks.com/blog/teaching-your-child-the-days-of-the-week

 

Perfect Picture Book Friday – Black Is Brown Is Tan

Perfect Picture Book Fridays are the creation of the lovely children’s book author Susanna Leonard Hill. Check in each week on Fridays for new book reviews. Susanna also has a complete list (alphabetically and by theme) of all the book reviews. It’s a wonderful resource if you’re looking for activities for a book, or books focused on a particular theme.

black_is_brown_is_tanTitle: Black Is Brown Is Tan

Author: Arnold Adoff

Illustrator: Emily Arnold McCully

Publisher: HarperCollins

Year: 2002

Genre: Fiction picture book

Ages: 4-8

Themes: Race; family life

Opening:

black is brown is tan

is girl is boy

is nose is

face

is all

the

colors

of     the     race

Synopsis: (from publisher’s website)

Brown-skinned mama, the color of chocolate milk and pumpkin pie. White-skinned daddy, not the color of milk or snow, but light with pinks and tiny tans. And their two children, the beautiful colors of both. For an all-American family, full of joy, warmth, and love,

this is the way it is for us 
this is the way we are

When it was first published in 1973, Black is Brown is Tan featured the first interracial family in children’s books. Decades later, Arnold Adoff and Emily Arnold McCully continue to offer a joyous and loving celebration of all the colors of the race, now newly embellished with bright watercolor paintings that depict a contemporary family of the twenty-first century. And the chorus rings true as ever:

black is brown is tan 
is girl is boy 
is nose is face 
is all the colors of the race

What makes it great: There aren’t many picture books that feature interracial families. This one not only features a black/white interracial family, but is about race and skin color. The text mirrors what kids of all colors notice about the people around them.

What readers notice: We have an interracial extended family, and my kids have biracial friends and classmates. They have often brought up the subject of differences in skin color and it’s nice to see a book that mirrors their own observations of the world.

What a writer notices: I love the rhythmic language of this book and the child-centered descriptions of skin color.

This page describes the mother:

i am black i am a brown sugar gown

a tasty tan and coffee pumpkin pie

with dark brown eyes and almond ears

and my face gets ginger red

when i puff and yell you into bed

 

And this page describes the father:

i am white i am white

i am light

with pinks and tiny tans

dark hair growing on my arms

that darken in the summer sun

brown eyes

big yellow ears

and my face gets tomato red

when i puff and yell you into bed

 

And I love the beautiful, songlike refrain:

this is the way it is for us 
this is the way we are

Activities/Resources:

HarperCollins has produced a teaching guide to go along with the book.